Typhoon Haiyan heads for Vietnam.

I have no words to say that would describe the destruction of property and loss of thousands of lives following super typhoon Haiyan’s rampage across the central Philippines. News from all over share stories of both the sad, tragic aftermath and the resilient hope towards rebuilding.

Although Haiyan has already exited the Philippines and is currently traversing over the West Philippine Sea, it’s trajectory shows it is expected to pay a visit next to mainland southeast Asia, particularly to parts of south China and to Vietnam — where I am destined to travel on Tuesday for a work-related activity.  And so, I took it upon myself to check up on Haiyan, and whether there was any remote chance that I’d end up catching up with her in Hanoi or Kon Tum.

The two animated images below were again taken by MTSAT and shows typhoon Haiyan crossing the southern tip of Hainan Island, China and heading towards northern Vietnam.

Animated MTSAT images of typhoon Haiyan heading towards northern Vietnam (approximately between 02:30 to 09:30 UTC 10/11/2013). (Image credit: NOAA Satellite and Information Service)

Animated MTSAT images of typhoon Haiyan heading towards northern Vietnam (approximately between 02:30 to 09:30 UTC 10/11/2013).
(Image credit: NOAA Satellite and Information Service)

Animated MTSAT images (visible) of typhoon Haiyan heading towards northern Vietnam (approximately between 02:30 to 09:30 UTC 10/11/2013). (Image credit: NOAA Satellite and Information Service)

Animated MTSAT images (visible) of typhoon Haiyan heading towards northern Vietnam
(approximately between 02:30 to 09:30 UTC 10/11/2013).
(Image credit: NOAA Satellite and Information Service)

Wunderground.com, on the other hand, shares the following maps that track Haiyan’s history and its projected location in the next couple of days:

Storm history of typhoon Haiyan. (Image credit: www.wunderground,com)

Storm history of typhoon Haiyan.
(Image credit: www.wunderground,com)

Trajectory of typhoon Haiyan’s location over Vietnam and China.
(Image credit: www.wunderground,com)

Forecast of Typhoon Haiyan's path, including storm categories, sea surface temperatures, and wind radius. (Image credit: www.wunderground.com)

Forecast of Typhoon Haiyan’s path, including storm categories, sea surface temperatures, and wind radius. (Image credit: www.wunderground.com)

Haiyan’s history shows that it was a Category 5 storm — a super typhoon! — before entering and upon landfall in the Philippines, and transitioned to Category 4 after battering central Philippines and exiting to the West Philippine Sea. Perhaps the sea temperature was not conducive and sufficiently warm enough to allow Haiyan to regather it strength, letting its intensity and speed gradually degenerate. The maps show that Haiyan has been reduced to storm Category 1 as of 3PM JST on 10 November 2013. And by 3PM Tuesday, November 12, it will have been reduced further into a tropical depression with maximum wind speeds of up to 39 mph (in contrast to its 190 mph prior to landfall in the Philippines!) when it crosses over to Guangxi province in China. The last map below would still show that typhoon Haiyan is still formidably a weather phenomenon I should be concerned about, especially due to its 8 to 16 inches of predicted rainfall capacity. Utmost precaution is still needed.

Predicted rainfall from the 06Z November 9, 2013 run of the HWRF model, for the 66-hour period ending at 00Z November 12, 2013. A 100-mile wide swath of 8 - 16 inches of rain (medium dark red colors) is predicted to affect northern Vietnam. (Source: Dr Jeff Masters' Blog; Image credit: NOAA/NCEP/EMC)

Predicted rainfall from the 06Z November 9, 2013 run of the HWRF model, for the 66-hour period ending at 00Z November 12, 2013. A 100-mile wide swath of 8 – 16 inches of rain (medium dark red colors) is predicted to affect northern Vietnam.
(Source: Dr Jeff Masters’ Blog; Image credit: NOAA/NCEP/EMC)

At the height of Haiyan’s strong winds and heavy rains last Saturday, I was thankful that I experienced only a fraction of its ferocity at where I lived in Manila. I shudder to think of encountering her again, only this time in a different country in the next couple of days, but wishful thinking, I hope to be thankful yet again that perhaps I am spared from witnessing her former might.

#Haiyan

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s